Tag Archives: customization

Customizing SharePoint’s Modern Lists’ Forms

Ya know that awesome new interface we get in Office 365 called Modern Lists? Ya know how that’s not editable, or customizable, or extensible? Well, ya know it right! It’s not.

However…

modern_list

Purty Modern List

Above is a typical modern list, in all of it’s glory. Pretty right? But I want to add some of my own code to this and do some cool customizations. Currently, that’s only reserved for the classic list view:

classic_list

Yucky Classic List

I just threw up a little in my mouth. 

What if we took the classic view, and persuaded it to be modern, but keep the beauty of customizations? It’s just some good ‘ole CSS, and yes I’ll share.

Quick steps on what to do:

  1. Download this little CSS file (click here for project on github).
  2. Upload the CSS file to SharePoint somewhere, like your Site Assets library
  3. Create a quick HTML file with just a link to the CSS file, i.e. <link rel=”stylesheet” href=”/SiteAssets/classic_modern.min.css”></link>.
  4. Upload the HTML file to SharePoint
  5. In the library where you uploaded the files, right click on the HTML file, Get Link, then select Restricted Link, and copy that URL
  6. Navigate to your list.
  7. Ensure it’s in Classic mode, and will stay that way. Go to List Settings, then Advanced settings. Scroll all the way down to List Experience and select Classic experience.
  8. Navigate back to your list and create a new item.
  9. Use the cog in the top right, and select Edit page.
  10. Add a Content Editor Web Part and set the Content Link to the URL of your HTML file.
  11. Save it all and reload the page, BLAMO
  12. I have a more indepth walk through on how to do this using a JavaScript file here, same applies to a CSS file.

classic_modern_list

YAY!

The flow and feel of the classic form is a lot more like the modern form, but ’tis classic.

Some Notes

  • Terrifyingly enough, the CSS for the modern lists are on the pages themselves, not in a CSS file I can reference. So there was a lot of copy/pasting of CSS from a modern list to this CSS file.
  • Your classic list form will have the full ribbon, this CSS is primarily focused on the form interface for users.
  • This will not do anything on the list view pages, I haven’t bothered styling those yet.
  • If you wanted to, you could put this CSS into a global CSS file so all classic lists will have similar interfaces.
  • This CSS is not all inclusive, it should get you most of the way there. If you do add to it, please feel free to share on the github project, or send me the changes.

Thanks, and ’til next time Happy SharePointing!

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Embedding your JavaScript into a SharePoint page

A very typical approach for client side development in SharePoint is to throw the code onto the page where you need it. You can alternatively put into the master page, but generally speaking, most code doesn’t need to run on each and every page. The following describes my preferred, tried and true, method of handling this.

Upload the Assets

Say you have some great JavaScript code provided by a developer or blogger, and you want to now use it on your page. First things first, get the JavaScript into your SharePoint site!

Upload the JS file into a library. I generally use SiteAssets, with a small folder structure for organization, like SiteAssets\js, or if there is more, sometimes like SiteAssets\webparts\mywebpartname.

Once the JS is uploaded, we now need a HTML file to reference it. This can be pretty simple HTML file. You can create it on your desktop (create a new text file, and rename the extension to .html) or using SharePoint Designer, you can create it directly in SharePoint. Throw it in the same place as your JS file, or however you have your assets structured.

As an example, we’ll take a block of code from one of my blog posts, we’re going to throw the necessary HTML and JS into the HTML file you created, something like:


<script src="//ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.10.2/jquery.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
<script src="/SiteAssets/Lozzi.Fields.js" type="text/javascript"></script>

<script type="text/javascript">
$(document).ready(function(){
ExecuteOrDelayUntilScriptLoaded(function(){
Lozzi.Fields.disableWithAllowance("Start Date", ["Project Managers"]);
Lozzi.Fields.disable("Task Status");
Lozzi.Fields.hide("% Complete");
},"sp.js");
});
</script>

This is all the HTML and code needed to run the JS I’m working with. Notice Line 2, the second <script tag. This is the path to the JS file you uploaded into SharePoint. Make sure the path is correct. This block of code above will differ for each and every JS example you work with.

Once the HTML file is saved, navigate to it through your browser and copy the link to the HTML file. You can do this simply by clicking on the file’s ellipses, the …, and copy the URL from there

copy file link

Embed in SharePoint

Ok, now that we have the JS file uploaded, and a HTML file created, let’s embed it in SharePoint! This is the easy part.

Navigate to the page you want to use this code on. Just use your browser and click to go to the page, pretty simple so far right?

Now edit the page: click the cog in the top right and select Edit Page

edit page

Once the page is in edit mode, click Add a Web Part button at the top of a zone, it doesn’t matter too much where. If you don’t have an Add a Web Part button, you’re probably using a wiki page, so click anywhere in the content area where you want add a web part, then click Insert Web Part.

add content editor web part

In the Add web part ribbon, select Media and Content on the left, and then select Content Editor. Click Add to add to your page. You should have something like:

added content editor web part

Notice the Content Editor web part added. Now click the web part, in the top right, and edit the web part.edit web part

In the tool pane on the right, paste in the URL to the HTML file. Click OK.

past html link in content editor

Afterwards, your content editor web part may look empty, or you may see some of your HTML, it depends on what you’re working with. My example, I’m just using JavaScript to hide fields on my page.

save content editor

Save the page and you should be good to go! Your code should fire off and you should see things happening. If not, if you question what’s going on, try using the developer tool bar in your browser, more on how here.

A couple of notes:

  • You may want to modify the Content Editor Web Part’s Chrome Type setting to hide the title from view
  • If you receive the error “Cannot retrieve the URL specified in the Content Link property. For more assistance, contact your site administrator.”, check the URL you’re pasting in. SharePoint can’t find it, make sure it’s valid. Paste it into a new browser window and see if downloads the file.
  • Make sure to structure your JS and HTML files well, you never know who’s going to look at it next.
  • Consider using the URL to the HTML file as a relative URL instead of a absolute URL. How? Consider the following URL is an absolute URL: https://sharepoint/sites/sitename/siteassets/myfile.js. Make it relative by dropping the first part: /sites/sitename/siteassets/myfile.js. This will keep it a wee bit more flexible and migrations in the future should be a little easier.

‘Til next time, Happy SharePointing!

Showing users’ profile pictures in a SharePoint list

Special thanks to Joann for the question!

A common use case is to have a list of people in a list in SharePoint, maybe they’re members of a project, contacts for a department, your favorite people to talk to, whatever it may be, you have a list. This example is a listing of my teammates:

slalom people list

Now I’d like to spice it up a little and see their pretty little faces. In my example, I’m just using the Title field to store their names (well, the Title field renamed to Name, regardless, same scenario). This won’y fly. We need to add a people picker to the list. I added one called Account Details. You could name yours Photo, Pic, Face, etc.

Add a people picker to the list, and add the correct values:sharepoint list with names

You can edit this view in Quick Edit mode, and copy/paste the Name column into the Account Details column.

Now let’s configure it to show their picture! (yes you could’ve done this with the above step, but for illustration purposes I add more steps)

When you edit the People Picker Field, check out the Show Field property.

edit people picker

See the few options at the bottom? Picture Only, select one. In my example, I selected 72×72

people pictures in sharepoint

BLAM! Profile pictures!!

Now I’ll let my team know I’m sharing their pretty faces.

‘Til next time, Happy SharePointing!

Why you should keep your on premise SharePoint when developing for Office 365

Office 365

If you’re diving into the wonderful world of developing for Office 365, or SharePoint Online, don’t let go of your development environment just yet!

Keeping your on premise instance of SharePoint 2013 for development will make a few things much easier, and will alleviate headaches in the long run.

For starters, make sure to have your environment configured with host named site collection, not separate web apps. This closely mimics how Office 365 is configured, and will help down the road. See this TechNet article for more details.

Errors

You heard it here first, Office 365 will error on you!

If you kept your on premises SharePoint, you can try the same app there, and if it errors, look through the logs. If it does not error, wait out Office 365 (more below).

I ran into this exact issue when developing a provider hosted app. Just couldn’t get past the error on Office 365. I spun up my virtual environment, tried it there, and received the same error. Searched the logs and found that my client ID wasn’t correct. Oops, I fat fingered something. Fixed and reran on Office 365 and success!

This won’t always work, as Office 365 does get updated more frequently than your environment does, and some of those updates may cause issues. Test it on your on-prem and then Open an Issue with Microsoft (more below).

You can also check the error log with your app, if you’re lucky. More on that here.

Waiting for Office 365

Sadly, Office 365 isn’t the best thing since sliced bread. Sometimes, Microsoft and team will randomly perform maintenance, and it appears whenever they want. I was working through the aforementioned provider hosted app, when all of a sudden, everything went read-only:

Site is read only Office 365

Great, now what?! Nothing. I couldn’t do anything, but my deadline kept getting closer!

What is a SharePointer to do? Dive into your on premise environment which you were wise enough to save, and finish development there. This read-only status kept for about 6 hours this day. This can really hurt development progress when this happens.

Another fun thing is when services get degraded.

Office 365 degraded SharePoint Online

This issue came up, and hindered one specific piece of what we were developing, sorry I forget what it is exactly. Sure enough, moving to on-premises saved the day.

One more story: I was working happily in Office 365 all day, with a deadline the next day, things were going smoothly. I left work at 5p, knowing I’d sneak in a little more work that night to polish up the app. I get home, enjoy my family time, and jump online once my kids are in bed. Sure enough, Office 365 is experiencing an issue and wouldn’t let me continue… grrr… Got up early the next morning and things started working again (I was able to meet my deadline).

Open an Issue with Microsoft

I have to hand it to Microsoft, their support team for Office 365 is responsive! Submit a support request through your tenant. If you’re working on someone else’s tenant, it’s okay, submit the request using your details. Gone are the days of having to submit under an account user just to hand the ticket off to someone else.

Once submitted, they call me back within 4 hours most times. Not too shabby. They aren’t the brightest set of support techs, sometimes things get escalated, but they really try hard to fix your issues.

Again, if you have your on-prem environment, you can submit the support request, then continue working on-prem.

Less Important, Until You Lose it

Office 365 is on the cloud, and if you lose your internet, you’re down. This may go for your on premises SharePoint as well if it’s not running locally on your workstation. Nothing hinders work more than not being able to access anything! Keep it mind.

Keep Your On Premises SharePoint

Just do it.

Bringing SharePoint Public: Using SharePoint Online for your web site

I am very pleased to share that I will be presenting at this month’s Boston Office 365 user group, on August 21st.

I will be sharing about using SharePoint Online public website, which you get with your Office 365 tenant, to host your web site. We’ll cover some techie stuff but I will mostly cover the more important aspects of a public web site, like search engine optimization, mobility, performance and more.

More details on the Boston Office 365 User Group web site. Hope to see you there!